EB3 Green Card

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com.

Unless the context shows otherwise, all answers here were provided by Rajiv and were compiled and reported by our editorial team from comments and blog on immigration.com.

Downgrading from EB-2 to EB-3

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Downgrading from EB-2 to EB-3

Video Transcript

I see no problem applying for EB-3 and then using whichever one is faster when the time comes. More...

 

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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Downgrading a Case from EB-2 to EB-3 for Priority Date Advantage

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch the Video on this FAQ:

Downgrading a case from EB2 to EB3 for priority date advantage

Video Transcript

1. Your EB-2 does not get affected. You can file EB-3/I-140 and I believe you can file a I-485 also if your dates are current.

2. Just the I-140. More...

 

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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EB-2 Approved - Applying for EB-3

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch the Video on this FAQ: EB-2 approved applying for EB-3

Video Transcript

This is mostly a question of procedure and policy. The USCIS has been indicating that if you have only one I-140 approved under EB-2 but you want to file under EB-3 you have to file another I-140 using the copy of the same labor certification - perm application and get an EB-3 approval first. More...

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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How Can I Downgrade from EB-2 to EB-3 and Consequences

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch the Video on this FAQ: How can I downgrade from EB2 to EB3 and the consequences

Video Transcript

If we have an EB-2 approved I-140 we apply for an EB-3 approval on the same form or you can file EB-3 I-140 and I-485 concurrently if the dates are current. If you file a I-485 that is prematurely filed when the priority date of EB-2 is not current, if EB-3 is denied on which basis you had filed the I-485 then the I-485 will also be denied. I would want your lawyers to review your case very carefully. Make sure that you don't have any other issues. If the second EB-3 filing gets denied it should not have any impact on the already approved I-140 unless the second filing reveals some problem with the case that was not addressed earlier. More...


Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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Can EB-2 Approved File For EB-3

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch the Video for this FAQ: Can EB-2 approved file for EB-3?

Video Transcript:

The way I think it will work is if you have both EB-3 and EB-2 approvals already good for you. You can use either one. If you have an EB-2 approval and you want to take advantage of the EB-3 upsurge in the Priority Dates, file for an EB-3 I-140 with a copy of the same PERM application. If the I-140 is approved quickly great, if not and the dates become current while the I-140 is still pending, with the receipt you can file an I-485. So you will have an EB-3 pending with a I-485 coming along. Now if tomorrow the dates become better, moving for EB-2 because you have both I-140s in the works, one approved and one pending or maybe both approved by that time, government will automatically give you the benefit of which ever category is moving the fastest.  More...

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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Can a Green Card be Started on F-1 Status?

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch Video on this FAQ: Can a green card be started on F-1 status?

Video Transcript

For people who are born in backed up countries where the priority dates are extremely backed up like India, China, Philippines, Mexico its dangerous to start a green card because F-1 status does not allow you to have immigrant intent whereas statuses like H-1, H-4, L-1, L-2, O-1 etc... allow you to have a dual intent. TN doesn't allow one to have a dual intent, so when you are in these kind of statuses where the dual intent is not permitted and you file a green card you run the risk of having trouble in getting any kinds of extensions, visa stamping or reentry into the U.S. But if you are born in a country like Saudi Arabia, Pakistan or Nepal or anywhere in Europe where these dates are not backed up then sometimes it is possible to get the whole green card wrapped in EB-1, EB-2 or EB-3 category within a year. More...

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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Compelling Circumstances EAD

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Compelling circumstances EAD

Video Transcript

I have given a few examples on my blog please look at that.

Your surgery was a good four years ago I don't know if there is something particularly difficult about your medical situation, but normally people with bypass surgery resume their normal lives. In your case, like I said if there are any particular circumstances, you can certainly apply for compelling circumstances EAD and you can keep getting that renewed. More

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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Administrative Review - EB3

Detailed question:

Answer:

EB-3, whether for nurses or any other worker, requires either 2 years of experience OR a bachelor's degree.

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Joining an employer after green card approval

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch the Video on this FAQ: Joining an employer after green card approval

Video Transcript

You not only were first working for this employer then you went to Canada, you were never out of status, then you came and joined the same employer after three months and actually you continued working for them. I don't think it is a problem. I don't think it will be a problem for your naturalization either. More...


Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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Canadian RN Planning to Migrate To US Through EB-3

Detailed question:

Answer:

There can be no RN green card without an employment in the USA and clearing of the required exams/licenses in the USA. As to EB-2, that would depend upon whether or not the job requires 5 years of experience after Bachelor;'s degree (or a Master's degree).

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Getting married when AOS I-485 is pending (following to join and other options)

Detailed question:

Answer:

Watch Video: Getting married when AOS I-485 is pending (following to join and other options)

 

Video Transcript: As per the law if you have an employment based case pending and you are married on the date your green card is approved, she is entitled to come through you through the same priority date and through a much shorter process called following to join. 

What is following to join?

Lets say you are here and your spouse is in India you will file form I-824 and request the government to send her papers to the consulate and that can take time. But this is processing time. It can take 6-10 months. But eventually she gets processed through an interview in the consulate following to join.

In the above situation H-1/H-4 is the only option because unless she is in USA in legal status she can't file adjustment of status. When you are outside you can do only following to join.

Get your H-1 stamping done and also her H-4 done. Both of you travel to USA on H-1 and H-4. If your priority date is current when you land you can file for her I-485 otherwise she can stay on H-4 and you can stay on H-1.

 

 

Note: This is a verbatim transcript of the referenced audio/video media delivered as oral communication, and, therefore, may not conform to written grammatical or syntactical form.

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The Proposed I-140 EAD Rule - FAQ's

Detailed question:

Answer:

Question 1: Redo the PERM or just the I-140. If redoing the PERM again then what's new in this regulation? 

Answer: After 180 days, you can extend H-1 even if 140 is withdrawn.

Question 2: It seems that there is no easy provision for EAD/AP for approved 140 applicants. So is there any point in waiting for this rule or Should I consider Visa stamping is only option for traveling outside US? Please suggest as I waited for a year or long thought they are going to give AP.

Answer: Your observation about EAD/AP is correct- no easier. I will be surprised if USCIS changes these proposed rules in any significant manner when they finalize.

Question 3: If I have consumed my 6 years of H-1B and I have approved I-140. If I go to India and of some reason I got stuck in India. After a while I want some other employer to file my H-1B petition other then with approved I-140 employer. Do the new employer can apply for my new H1b cap exempt petition based on approved i-140 from my old employer. OR New H-1B petition from the new employer comes under H-1 cap count?

Answer: You have raised two separate issues. One, the I-140 can be used to extend your H-1 through ANY employer, if it is not withdrawn within 180 days of approval. Two, you are exempt from H-1 cap if your H-1 was approved any time within the last 6 years.

Question 4: Is there any provision for promotions internally within a company that filed the petition and the I-140 is approved more than 180 days previously?

Answer: These regs will only clarify (I am not sure they really do that) what "same or similar" jobs are. That concept is crucial when your I-140 has been approved and I-485 has been pending 180 days. At that time, you can accept a same or similar job anywhere, including within the same company, and NOT have to start your green card all over again. That comes under the topic of AC21 portability.

Question 5: Is direct portability of I-140 across multiple employers, ever possible. because I-140 is a property of the Employer and not the Employee (unlike 1-485) ?.Can we suggest any other creative options, of working around this legal hurdle. a. Can PERM be made portable across multiple employers. So employees donot have to go through the hassle of the PERM filing, repeatedly. This will save, almost 4 months of pre PERM filing effort and another 8-10 months of PERM processing window.

b. Or, can the I 140 be made an Employee’s property after 180 days it is approved. If that can be done then portability of the same may be legally possible across different Employers

Answer: The Priority date IS the "property" of the employee, NOT of the employer. So, an employee can port it to any job, anywhere, any number of times. But, I do not think they are excusing us from having to refile the PERM.

Question 6: Does the 60 day grace period is accepted in this case; H-1 Ext filed before expiry of I-94, then Current H-1 and I-94 expired, then H-1 Ext denied. Can we use 60 day grace period for filing new H-1 with new employer? In what cases does this 10 day validity before and after petition dates is used. The 60-day grace period appears to apply only in those cases where an approved H-1 employment abruptly comes to an end. The proposed regs say, upto 60 days may be given: "on the basis of the cessation of the employment on which the alien’s classification was based".

Answer: The 10 days allow you enter (but, not work) upto 10 days before the date your "validity period" (approval of petition) begins, and another 10 days to leave the USA (but, not work), after that period ends.

Question 7: Emp A - I-140 Approved and Moved to Emp B. Got i-140 with Emp B and priority date retained. submitted Emp A Experience letter while fling PERM. Now I want to move to Emp C. Do I still need to get experience letter from Emp B? If I am not able to get experience letter from Emp B, Can Emp C file PERM. if so and filed new PERM and I-140 with Emp C, Can I still retain priority date even though if its not same or similar job?

Answer: There are two fundamental principles that you need to apply to your case:

1. Priority date transfer does NOT require that your jobs must be same or similar.

2. Experience letters are NOT required for priority date transfer or retention. 

Question 8: Now that it is clear that there is almost nothing much in the so called reform, how can the immigrant community represent themselves forcefully, while the public comment period is in place? I understand that each one of us can go and put our comments, but is your firm, or someone else, planning to represent us? For lack of proper words, these so called reforms are a piece of trash, and only done to pretend as if reforms are taking place. It could not be worse actually. 

Answer: There is a limit on what USCIS can do without action from the Congress. You can certainly write your comments and several organizations will place their comments on the record as well. NORMALLY, USCIS does not change the rules much once they have been proposed. I think US immigration policy in "skilled" immigration is distressingly short-sighted. Our adopted country does not recognize the value brought in by us.

Question 9: My I-140 already withdrawn/revoked after 180 days of initial approval date. Now after implements new rule, will it apply for my case to extend my H-1 beyond 6 years?

Answer: I cannot say for sure whether USCIS intends to apply these rules retroactively. I hope they do. 

Question 10: Can you comment on what date will this become effective ? Is it after the comment period is over?

Answer: The effective date is unpredictable. Usually, it is a few months after the comments are over. 

Question 11: I need to clarify regarding the I-140 EAD for H-4. If the principal applicant has I-140 approved but the priority date for that category and country in the visa bulletin is more than 10 years back, Can the dependents, such as H-4, apply for I-140 EAD without the documentation for compelling evidence? If no, what are the examples of compelling evidence?I think the regulation does very little incremental for the EB categories. As mentioned, it provides clarification rather than provide more flexibility to the household or family of EB categories. I am disappointed with the revisions that have been made.Also, the compelling evidence was not required till now. What happens to those H-4 EADs which were issued since USCIS started applications from May 27, 2015? How would those H-4 EADs which are approved on the basis of I-140 approval of principal applicant be dissolved?Also, if the spouse moves from H-4 to H-4 EAD. Can he/she move from H-4 EAD to H-1B or any other non-immigrant category? Does the form I-539 allows movement among all categories?

Answer: H-4 EAD does NOT require compelling evidence. That is a different rule: http://www.immigration.com/blogs/form-i-140-form-i-765/h-4-ead-rule-cont...

I-594 does allow movement between all categories. H-4 to H-1 is definitely no problem. I agree; I am not too thrilled with the regs. But there is a limit to what Pres. Obama can do, folks. 

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Writ of Mandamus against delay

Detailed question:

Answer:

See clip from Attorney Rajiv S. Khanna's conference call video that addresses this question.

https://youtu.be/F0YZD8zWm88?t=333

FAQ Transcript:

Writ is simply order of the court or a formal order.

Mandamus is to ask the government to do something, which it is legally obliged to do. It is important to understand what the court can and cannot do. First of all the court has to decide whether your case has taken too long unreasonably long to the extent where the delay itself becomes unreasonable. So very difficult thing to prove, depends upon the court. There is a ruling I remember litigating this issue very vigorously in Washington D.C. and one of the cases that was against us was a case from  Board of Indian Appeal that's what they called BIA not to be confused with Board of Immigration Appeal but Board of Indian Appeal . 

Usually if a group of people want to be declared Indian Tribe because if you are an Indian Tribe one of the things you can do is have unique rights within your own area such as opening a Casino. They had a determination pending for over ten years and court said that is not unreasonable.

So first hurdle is to actually be able to prove, of course before that there is hurdle of legal fees, it can be quite expensive to litigate an issue. Second hurdle is proving that delays are unreasonable, unreasonable according to what. The government processing times are merely guesses; they don't give us a right. The third thing which is also important, court cannot ask the government to decide  I-485 in your favor, they can only make government  act, whether the action is Yes, No or RFE. 

And my final point is something I find very odd, I never  believed to be possible until I saw it happened to  myself. The government behaves like a spoilt child because they have lost the case they can send you 30 page RFE requesting information that you would not believe could even be asked.

So because the court cannot tell the government to decide the case in your favor, they can only order the case to be decided Yes or No. You could end up creating more issues. The Freedom of Information Act usually does not help in these cases much. 

So keeping in view all these things personally my approach is very simple I tell people, are you at the point where you are so sick and tired that you either want a yes so you can get your Green card and stay in this country or get Naturalization whatever the benefit is or get a No and just leave, one way or the other. Once you come to that point that's when I want to litigate. Again it also depends upon the circuit, you know that in USA there are different Judicial circuits on the Federal level. So some circuits are more open to certain issues, some circuits are not open. We have to look at the law of the circuit also.              

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Green card through a future job

Detailed question:

Answer:

See clip from Attorney Rajiv S. Khanna's conference call video that addresses this question. 

https://youtu.be/PreNUXXW9KU

FAQ Transcript:

There are only two things.

1. “I” the employee has the good faith intention in taking that job. You may never have to join that job but you should have the good faith intention to take up that job when the green card comes through. You may never have to do it but you should have the intention.

2. The employer must have the same good faith intention of hiring you sometime in the future. What is that time within a commercially reasonable period after you get your green card or any time before that?

 Let’s say you get your green card approval today the future employer should hire you within 3,4 5 months. That is the commercial reasonable period. 

So applying for a green card through a future job - can it be done and the answer is "yes" it is allowed. The employer should have ability to pay wages and that is an important thing. Other than that all that is needed is good faith intention on part of the employer and employee to give and take the job.

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Changing from EB-3 to EB-2 Category

Detailed question:

Answer:

See clip from Attorney Rajiv S. Khanna's conference call video that addresses this question.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXq6DaDK7AA#t=472

FAQ Transcript 

The idea is once an I-140 is approved under any category EB-1/EB-2/EB-3 the priority date becomes the property of the employee. Whether the employee goes to work for a different employer or a different job completely or like a different job where you go from being a IT professional to a civil engineer you would still carry your priority date. This is not AC21.  AC21 requires same or similar job but that also requires I-140 approval, I- 485 pending for 180 days. This is not that case. The priority date transfer from EB-2 to EB-3 requires only the I-140 is approved. 

Hence the answer to the question is YES. If you get a job with the same employer or with a new employer that requires a masters degree or bachelors plus five year experience type of qualifications and your priority date will remain the same. The difference between AC21 and priority date carry over date is this: In AC21 you do not have to re file the green card. You can take the whole green card and take it over to a same or similar job if you’re I-140 is approved and I- 485 is pending 180 days. But in the priority date transfer you carry forward nothing. You only carry the priority date and it can be ported from EB-2 to EB-3/EB-1 to EB-2/EB2 to EB-1 it doesn’t matter. There is no requirement that the job that you are filing for is same or similar. That is the difference between AC21 and priority date transfer.

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Changing Jobs During Green Card

Detailed question:

Answer:

 

See clip from Attorney Rajiv S. Khanna's conference call video that addresses this question.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=84359240&v=uaBshBiaCUg&x-yt-ts=1421782837&feature=player_detailpage#t=719


FAQ Transcript

In this scenario we have employment based people who are good workers, very skilled people and they have a lot of trouble changing jobs or advancing in their careers because technically while the green card is going on even if you take up a promotion you could end up losing your current green card and have to start all over again - at least part of the process. So this is not a good thing. 

Keeping in view with the current law what Obama had said on November 21st about his plan and finally what this bill (Immigration Innovation Act) says. 

First of all under the current law if you change your employers before your I-140 approval is obtained you will lose everything. You have to start all over again. That means if you are a EB-1 based candidate your I-140 must be approved. If you are an EB-2 or EB-3 based upon the labor certification your perm application must be approved and then you’re I-140 must be approved. Remember I-140 can be filed by premium processing. So you got to get your I-140 approved very quickly. Generally speaking if you move before I-140 is approved you get nothing. If you move after I-140 is approved but before I- 485 is filed you keep your priority date and you keep the right to extend H-1 beyond six years as long as the I-140 is not revoked. This is an important concept to remember. You keep your priority date - that means when you go to the next employer you will have to start the green card all over again but your priority date will be the date the first case was filed which again is a very big advantage. The priority date is capped but here is an additional provision. if your priority dates are current and you have filed I-485 with the old employer, after 180 days of the I-485 pendency and the I-140 approval you can take any job anywhere with any employer and be able to carry the same green card forward without having to redo any work. so before I-140 you get nothing, after I-140 and before I-485 you get your priority date and the right to extend your H-1 beyond 6 years and after I-140 approval plus I-485 filing 180 days thereafter you get the right to keep your green card even if you take a slight promotion with another employer or move to an entirely different employer as long as the jobs are same or similar. 

President Obama said normally applicant can only file the last step - the I-485 if the priority date is current. He said he would change that by allowing the applicant to file I-485 along with the I-140 no matter where the priority dates are. This is a big advantage. That means technically just roughly speaking once you start your green card process through PERM in a year and half you could be free to join any employer – proximately or two years at the most as long as you  maintain the job category you are in. President Obama also said he is going to make it clear that advancement in career is considered to be same or similar job so that your green card will not be disturbed. And that idea has been very welcomed. Combine that with the Immigration Innovation Act you could be getting your green card much earlier than 3, 4, 5....10 years that you are waiting for right now. So all these things combined are very good signs for people in a situation such as the query above. If you have not yet got your I-140 approved and you are far from that stage it’s ok as long as you don’t have H-1 problems. If you are about to get the I-140 approved then get it approved. If you have H-1 issues beyond six years make sure the second H-1 is approved before you change employers. Once the H-1 is approved for 3 more years even if the old employer revokes the I-140 they cannot take your right to the H-1 you already got. You can start another green card and protect yourself.

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Obama's Immigration Action - EB-3 Quota

Detailed question:

Answer:

Obama's Immigration Action plan could impact all waiting time for EB categories. We are not clear how far or how quickly. There is no indication that the method counting green cards will be changed to One per family, instead of one for each family member in an employment-based case. President has asked for recommendations for improvement within 120 days. We shall see.

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EB-2 or EB-3

Detailed question:

Answer:

Internships do qualify as experience. You need to get your degrees evaluated under AACAO EDGE standards first .

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Contacting USCIS when EB-3 is Changed to EB-2

Detailed question:

Answer:

Send an email to the Nebraska Service Center at NCSCfollowup.NSC@dhs.gov or the Texas Service Center at TSC.NCSCfollowup@uscis.dhs.gov.  Make sure to include the Case Number and A# of the beneficiary(s).  If applicable, attached scans of any notices for the USCIS to reference.

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Premium Processing for EB-1-3

Detailed question:

Answer:

USCIS does not anticipate expanding Premium Processing Service to include EB-1-3 multinational executives and managers for the foreseeable future.

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Professional Experience for EB-3

Detailed question:

Answer:

Usually, we cannot use the experience gained with the same employer who is applying for the green card, UNLESS the job being offered for green card is more than 50% different than the earlier jobs for that employer.

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Restart the green card under EB-2 category

Detailed question:

Answer:

People with over 5 years of exp. after a 4-year degree may be ale to restart the green card under EB-2 category and then port their PD. Basically, you are redoing the PERM and I-140 for an EB-2 level job.

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EB-3 to EB-2 with the same employer

Detailed question:

Answer:

You can, if the job offered is more than 50% different than the job you were performing so far with the same employer.

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EB-3 category

Detailed question:

Answer:

It is possible, but the green card will have to be started again from PERM.

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Job Change after I-140

Detailed question:

Answer:

It is possible and common for employer B to get H-1 extension based upon an I-140 approval of employer A. You need to speak about the details with a lawyer.

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EB3 to EB2 Portability

Detailed question:

Answer:

Theoretically, this is possible. As to the practical implications, you must speak with the lawyers who will represent you in the second green card process.

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Can EB3 PD be carried to new EB2?

Detailed question:

Answer:

It is logically inconsistent for two jobs from the same company for the same individual. If you have a good, logical, true explanation, there is no law that says you cannot have two PERM apps for the same individual for different jobs with the same company. But you cannot transfer PD until the I-140 is approved. I see no issue with changing jobs right away. You may have just enough time.

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Changing to Skilled worker

Detailed question:

Answer:

If the job requires a Bach. degree, you are entitled to the skilled worker/EB-3 category.

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My wife filed for Skilled Worker

Detailed question:

Answer:

There is nothing in law that stops you from getting an NIV. But grant of visas like B-1/B-2 is completely discretionary.

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EB2 or EB3

Detailed question:

Answer:

Generally speaking, if BS and MS are in the same or similar fields, you should be able to combine them to arrive at a 4-year degree for EB2 purposes. You should have a shot at EB2.

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EB3 to EB2 and I-140 Refile

Detailed question:

Answer:

Generally speaking, I see this as a good opportunity to start a new PERM under EB2 and then transfer the priority date. Speak with your lawyers.

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EB2 from EB3 qualification

Detailed question:

Answer:

The term "EB" means employment-based. EB-2 is available for people with post graduate degrees (by US standards) OR a 4 years bach. degree with five years of progressively responsible experience. You need to speak with your lawyers about applying for an EB-2 and transferring your priority date.

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Watch out - the prioirty date cut off in March was effective immediately

Detailed question:

Answer:

The April 2009 Visa Bulletin was issued on March 9th. The VB said the visa numbers for EB3 were unavailable with immediate effect (Philippines retrogressed to 2003).

This is highly unusual. The visa bulletin is a forecast for the month ahead and does not take effect immediately. But State Department says that this one was of immediate effect.

What does this mean?

1. For people going through consular processing (instead of AOS), consulates with be able to issue immigrant visas only in rare instances where visa numbers were obtained before March 9.

2. Similarly, USCIS will not approve any adjustments unless the visa numbers had already had been obtained.

3. Cases filed after March 9th subject to "immediate effect" will most likely be rejected.

4. We do not yet know if USCIS will eject I-485's filed during March based on the March Visa Bulletin issued February 10, 2009, but it seems unlikely that they will.

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